Yijun Huang, PhD

Dr. Huang earned his Ph.D. in bioengineering from University of Pennsylvania and is currently a Senior Scientist in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is co-director of the Fundus Photograph Reading Center, UW-Madison and co-founder and Chief Technology Officer for EyeKor. Dr. Huang has 15 years experience in developing software and hardware imaging solutions for ophthalmic imaging applications both in academic and industrial environments. Dr. Huang's research interests include evaluating and developing technologies relating to ophthalmic imaging and analysis (e.g., computerized disease detection, classification, and monitoring), and using them to gain insights into disease progression and treatment effects in large-scale multi-center clinical trials.

Recent Publications

2015

Related Articles

The epidemiology of vitreoretinal interface abnormalities as detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: the beaver dam eye study.

Ophthalmology. 2015 Apr;122(4):787-95

Authors: Meuer SM, Myers CE, Klein BE, Swift MK, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

Related Articles

The epidemiology of vitreoretinal interface abnormalities as detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: the beaver dam eye study.

Ophthalmology. 2015 Apr;122(4):787-95

Authors: Meuer SM, Myers CE, Klein BE, Swift MK, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence and interrelationships of epiretinal membranes (ERMs), vitreomacular traction (VMT), macular cysts, paravascular cysts (PVCs), lamellar macular holes (LMHs), full-thickness macular holes (FTMHs), and visual impairment in a population-based study of older adults.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
PARTICIPANTS: There were 1913 participants aged 63 to 102 years at the 20-year Beaver Dam Eye Study follow-up examination in 2008-2010, of whom 1540 (2980 eyes) had gradable spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) scans of the macula in at least 1 eye.
METHODS: The presence of ERMs and other retinal lesions was determined by standardized grading of macular SD OCT scans and photographs of 3 standard fields.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epiretinal membranes, VMT, macular cysts, PVCs, LMHs, FTMHs, and visual impairment.
RESULTS: By using SD OCT, the prevalence of ERMs (34.1%), VMT (1.6%), macular cysts (5.6%), PVCs (20.0%), LMHs (3.6%), and FTMHs (0.4%) was estimated. The prevalence of macular cysts (P < 0.001), ERMs (P < 0.001), and VMT (P = 0.005) increased with age; the prevalence of PVCs (P = 0.05) decreased with age; and the prevalence of LMHs was not associated with age (P = 0.70). The prevalence of macular cysts, LMHs, and ERMs was higher in eyes with a history of cataract surgery. Macular cysts and ERMs were more common in eyes with retinal diseases, such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and retinal detachment, than in eyes without these conditions. Macular cysts, ERMs, and FTMHs were associated with visual impairment. While adjusting for age and sex, macular cysts (odds ratio [OR], 3.96; P < 0.0001), PVCs (OR, 1.45, P = 0.007), LMHs (OR, 10.62; P < 0.001), VMT (OR, 2.72, P = 0.01), and visual impairment (OR, 3.23; P < 0.001) were more frequent in eyes with ERMs compared with eyes without ERMs.
CONCLUSIONS: Epiretinal membranes are associated with macular cysts, PVCs, LMHs, VMT, and visual impairment. Further follow-up will allow better understanding of the natural history of ERMs and VMT and their relationships to the development of macular cysts and LMHs in the aging population.

PMID: 25556116 [PubMed - in process]

Related Articles

The epidemiology of vitreoretinal interface abnormalities as detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: the beaver dam eye study.

Ophthalmology. 2015 Apr;122(4):787-95

Authors: Meuer SM, Myers CE, Klein BE, Swift MK, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

Related Articles

Retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in eyes without retinal abnormalities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

Am J Ophthalmol. 2015 Mar;159(3):445-56.e1

Authors: Myers CE, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Swift MK, Chandler CS, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

Related Articles

Retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in eyes without retinal abnormalities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

Am J Ophthalmol. 2015 Mar;159(3):445-56.e1

Authors: Myers CE, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Swift MK, Chandler CS, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine relationships of age, sex, and systemic and ocular conditions with retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain ocular coherence tomography (SD OCT) in participants without retinal disease.
DESIGN: Longitudinal study.
METHODS: setting: Population-based cohort. study population: Persons aged 43-86 years living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin in 1988-1990. observation procedures: Retinal thickness was measured via SD OCT at the Beaver Dam Eye Study examination in 2008-2010. Retinal disease was determined by ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, or SD OCT. main outcome measures: Retinal thickness from the inner limiting membrane to the Bruch membrane.
RESULTS: The retina was thickest in the inner circle (mean 334.5 μm) and thinnest in the center subfield (285.4 μm). Mean retinal thickness decreased with age in the inner circle (P < .0001) and outer circle (P < .0001). Adjusting for age, eyes in men had thicker retinas than eyes in women in the center subfield (P < .001) and inner circle (P < .001). Sex, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with center subfield thickness. Sex and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the inner circle. Alcohol consumption, age, axial length/corneal curvature ratio, cataract surgery, ocular perfusion pressure, and peak expiratory flow rate were associated with retinal thickness in the outer circle.
CONCLUSIONS: This study provides data for retinal thickness measures in eyes of individuals aged 63 years and older without retinal disease. This information may be useful for clinical trials involving the effects of interventions on retinal thickness and for comparisons with specific retinal diseases affecting the macula.

PMID: 25461295 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in eyes without retinal abnormalities: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

Am J Ophthalmol. 2015 Mar;159(3):445-56.e1

Authors: Myers CE, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Swift MK, Chandler CS, Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Pak JW, Danis RP, Klein R

2013

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Effect of optical coherence tomography scan decentration on macular center subfield thickness measurements.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):4512-8

Authors: Pak JW, Narkar A, Gangaputra S, Klein R, Klein B, Meuer S, Huang Y, Danis RP

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Effect of optical coherence tomography scan decentration on macular center subfield thickness measurements.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):4512-8

Authors: Pak JW, Narkar A, Gangaputra S, Klein R, Klein B, Meuer S, Huang Y, Danis RP

Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of optical coherence tomography macular grid displacement on retinal thickness measurements.
METHODS: SD-OCT macular scans of 66 eyes with various retinal thicknesses were selected. Decentration of the 1-, 3-, 6-mm-diameter macular grid was simulated by manually adjusting the distance between center of the fovea (cFovea) and center of the grid (cGrid). Center subfield thickness (CSF) between the internal limiting membrane and the top of the retinal pigment epithelium was measured along the displacement distance where the grid was displaced in eight cardinal directions from the cFovea in steps of 100 μm within the central 1-mm subfield and then by 200 μm within the inner subfields. One-way/mixed-effects repeated-measures ANOVA models were used to determine changes of CSF (ΔCSF) as a function of displacement distance (for α = 0.05, power = 0.80 and effect size = 0.1). The interactions between the displacement distance and direction, center point thickness (CPT), and foveal contour were also analyzed.
RESULTS: The CSF measurement showed statistically significant error when the displacement distance between cFovea and cGrid exceeded 200 μm. The direction of displacement did not affect the ΔCSF-distance relationship, while the CPT and foveal contour significantly affected the relationship, in that some subgroups showed slightly larger tolerance in the displacement distance up to 300 μm before reaching significant ΔCSF.
CONCLUSIONS: Small displacement distances of the macular grid from the cFovea affect CSF measurements throughout a broad range of thicknesses and retinal contour alterations from disease. Accurate registration of OCT scans or post hoc repositioning of the grid is essential to optimize CSF accuracy.

PMID: 23761091 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Effect of optical coherence tomography scan decentration on macular center subfield thickness measurements.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):4512-8

Authors: Pak JW, Narkar A, Gangaputra S, Klein R, Klein B, Meuer S, Huang Y, Danis RP

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Development of a semi-automatic segmentation method for retinal OCT images tested in patients with diabetic macular edema.

PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82922

Authors: Huang Y, Danis RP, Pak JW, Luo S, White J, Zhang X, Narkar A, Domalpally A

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Development of a semi-automatic segmentation method for retinal OCT images tested in patients with diabetic macular edema.

PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82922

Authors: Huang Y, Danis RP, Pak JW, Luo S, White J, Zhang X, Narkar A, Domalpally A

Abstract
PURPOSE: To develop EdgeSelect, a semi-automatic method for the segmentation of retinal layers in spectral domain optical coherence tomography images, and to compare the segmentation results with a manual method.
METHODS: SD-OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis) scans of 28 eyes (24 patients with diabetic macular edema and 4 normal subjects) were imported into a customized MATLAB application, and were manually segmented by three graders at the layers corresponding to the inner limiting membrane (ILM), the inner segment/ellipsoid interface (ISe), the retinal/retinal pigment epithelium interface (RPE), and the Bruch's membrane (BM). The scans were then segmented independently by the same graders using EdgeSelect, a semi-automated method allowing the graders to guide/correct the layer segmentation interactively. The inter-grader reproducibility and agreement in locating the layer positions between the manual and EdgeSelect methods were assessed and compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test.
RESULTS: The inter-grader reproducibility using the EdgeSelect method for retinal layers varied from 0.15 to 1.21 µm, smaller than those using the manual method (3.36-6.43 µm). The Wilcoxon test indicated the EdgeSelect method had significantly better reproducibility than the manual method. The agreement between the manual and EdgeSelect methods in locating retinal layers ranged from 0.08 to 1.32 µm. There were small differences between the two methods in locating the ILM (p = 0.012) and BM layers (p<0.001), but these were statistically indistinguishable in locating the ISe (p = 0.896) and RPE layers (p = 0.771).
CONCLUSIONS: The EdgeSelect method resulted in better reproducibility and good agreement with a manual method in a set of eyes of normal subjects and with retinal disease, suggesting that this approach is feasible for OCT image analysis in clinical trials.

PMID: 24386127 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Development of a semi-automatic segmentation method for retinal OCT images tested in patients with diabetic macular edema.

PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82922

Authors: Huang Y, Danis RP, Pak JW, Luo S, White J, Zhang X, Narkar A, Domalpally A

2012

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Signal quality assessment of retinal optical coherence tomography images.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2133-41

Authors: Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Lee KE, Narkar AR, Klein R, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Danis RP

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Signal quality assessment of retinal optical coherence tomography images.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2133-41

Authors: Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Lee KE, Narkar AR, Klein R, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Danis RP

Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to assess signal quality of retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images from multiple devices using subjective and quantitative measurements.
METHODS: A total of 120 multiframe OCT images from 4 spectral domain OCT devices (Cirrus, RTVue, Spectralis, and 3D OCT-1000) were evaluated subjectively by trained graders, and measured quantitatively using a derived parameter, maximum tissue contrast index (mTCI). An intensity histogram decomposition model was proposed to separate the foreground and background information of OCT images and to calculate the mTCI. The mTCI results were compared with the manufacturer signal index (MSI) provided by the respective devices, and to the subjective grading scores (SGS).
RESULTS: Statistically significant correlations were observed between the paired methods (i.e., SGS and MSI, SGS and mTCI, and mTCI and MSI). Fisher's Z transformation indicated the Pearson correlation coefficient ρ ≥ 0.8 for all devices. Using the Deming regression, correlation parameters between the paired methods were established. This allowed conversion from the proprietary MSI values to SGS and mTCI that are universally applied to each device.
CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests signal quality of retinal OCT images can be evaluated subjectively and objectively, independent of the devices. Together with the proposed histogram decomposition model, mTCI may be used as a standardization metric for OCT signal quality that would affect measurements.

PMID: 22427567 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Signal quality assessment of retinal optical coherence tomography images.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2133-41

Authors: Huang Y, Gangaputra S, Lee KE, Narkar AR, Klein R, Klein BE, Meuer SM, Danis RP