Seth Eaton, VMD, DACVO

Dr. Eaton is a Board-Certified Veterinary Ophthalmologist. He received his veterinary degree with honors from the University of Pennsylvania and completed his residency in comparative ophthalmology at the University of California, Davis. He is a clinical member of OSOD with experience in preclinical ocular drug development and ocular toxicology, including on- and off-target toxicity.  Prior to joining OSOD, he established the ophthalmology service at Cornell University Veterinary Specialists (CUVS) in Stamford, Connecticut. His clinical and research interests include comparative ocular oncology, ocular toxicity of targeted therapies, and translational medicine and ophthalmology. 

Recent Publications

2017

Related Articles

Effects of topically applied heterologous serum on reepithelialization rate of superficial chronic corneal epithelial defects in dogs.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2017 May 01;250(9):1014-1022

Authors: Eaton JS, Hollingsworth SR, Holmberg BJ, Brown MH, Smith PJ, Maggs DJ

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Effects of topically applied heterologous serum on reepithelialization rate of superficial chronic corneal epithelial defects in dogs.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2017 May 01;250(9):1014-1022

Authors: Eaton JS, Hollingsworth SR, Holmberg BJ, Brown MH, Smith PJ, Maggs DJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of topical application of undiluted heterologous serum on time to corneal reepithelialization in dogs with superficial chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs). DESIGN Multicenter, randomized, double-masked, controlled clinical trial. ANIMALS 41 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES After collection of baseline clinical and historical data, dogs were randomly assigned to receive topically applied undiluted heterologous serum (n = 22) or isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (19) along with tobramycin and atropine. Epithelial debridement (at all visits) and grid keratotomy (at visits 2, 3, and 4) of SCCEDs were performed. Ophthalmic examination including fluorescein application was performed once weekly for 4 weeks or until corneal reepithelialization. Clinicians and owners were masked to treatment group. RESULTS No differences in baseline data were detected between treatment groups. No difficulties with medication administration, noncompliance, or adverse reactions were noted. All SCCEDs in both groups healed by 4 weeks after treatment began. Median time to reepithelialization (2 weeks) was not significantly different between serum-treated and placebo-treated eyes. Irrespective of treatment group, median time to reepithelialization was not significantly different for Boxers versus non-Boxer breeds. Direct correlations were detected between time to reepithelialization and vascularization score at study entry, vascularization score at time of reepithelialization, and ulcer area at study entry in both groups. Time to reepithelialization was not correlated with age, sex, or duration of signs in either group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical application of undiluted heterologous serum was well tolerated by dogs with SCCEDs but, as an adjunct to standard treatment, did not reduce time to corneal reepithelialization.

PMID: 28414606 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Effects of topically applied heterologous serum on reepithelialization rate of superficial chronic corneal epithelial defects in dogs.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2017 May 01;250(9):1014-1022

Authors: Eaton JS, Hollingsworth SR, Holmberg BJ, Brown MH, Smith PJ, Maggs DJ

2010

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Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis due to Neospora hughesi and equine motor neuron disease in a mule.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2010 Jul;13(4):259-65

Authors: Finno CJ, Eaton JS, Aleman M, Hollingsworth SR

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Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis due to Neospora hughesi and equine motor neuron disease in a mule.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2010 Jul;13(4):259-65

Authors: Finno CJ, Eaton JS, Aleman M, Hollingsworth SR

Abstract
CASE DESCRIPTION: A 23-year-old female mule was presented for bilateral ocular abnormalities and an abnormal pelvic limb gait.
CLINICAL FINDINGS: Anisocoria, unilateral enophthalmos, medial strabismus, ptosis, pupillary light reflex deficits, and bilateral reticulated pigmentary retinopathy were observed on ophthalmic examination. Neurologic abnormalities included right-sided facial nerve paralysis, extensive symmetric muscle atrophy, and asymmetric pelvic limb ataxia with an abnormal pelvic limb gait. A positive titer (1:40) for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) associated with Neospora hughesi was obtained from cerebrospinal fluid with minimal (<1 red blood cell/microL) blood contamination. Muscle biopsies of the sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis muscle revealed predominantly type I neurogenic muscle atrophy, consistent with a diagnosis of equine motor neuron disease (EMND).
TREATMENT AND OUTCOME: Treatment included a 2-month course of ponazuril (5 mg/kg PO q24 h), vitamin E (8000 IU PO q24 h), and selenium (2 mg PO q24 h). Clinical improvement was not observed after 2 months although the mule remained stable. Clinical deterioration was reported upon discontinuation of the ponazuril after a 2-month course.
CONCLUSION: Concurrent disease with EPM associated with N. hughesi and EMND should be considered in cases demonstrating cranial nerve abnormalities, pronounced symmetric muscle atrophy, unusual asymmetric gait abnormalities, and reticulated pigmentary retinopathy.

PMID: 20618805 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis due to Neospora hughesi and equine motor neuron disease in a mule.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2010 Jul;13(4):259-65

Authors: Finno CJ, Eaton JS, Aleman M, Hollingsworth SR