Paul L. Kaufman, MD

Dr. Kaufman is a Professor in the UW Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. His research centers on studies of the physiology, pharmacology, morphology, cell biology, genetic manipulation, neural control, biomechanics and aging of the aqueous humor formation and drainage and accommodative mechanisms in the non-human primate, seeking to understand the pathophysiology and develop new therapies for the human diseases of glaucoma and presbyopia.

Recent Publications

2018

Effects of Lentivirus-Mediated C3 Expression on Trabecular Meshwork Cells and Intraocular Pressure.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2018 Oct 01;59(12):4937-4944

Authors: Tan J, Fan N, Wang N, Feng B, Yang M, Liu G, Wang Y, Zhu X, Kaufman PL, Pang IH, Liu X

Effects of Lentivirus-Mediated C3 Expression on Trabecular Meshwork Cells and Intraocular Pressure.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2018 Oct 01;59(12):4937-4944

Authors: Tan J, Fan N, Wang N, Feng B, Yang M, Liu G, Wang Y, Zhu X, Kaufman PL, Pang IH, Liu X

Abstract
Purpose: We evaluated the effects of lentivirus-mediated exoenzyme C3 transferase (C3) expression on cultured primary human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells in vitro, and on rat intraocular pressure (IOP).
Methods: HTM cells were cultured and treated with lentivirus vectors expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) only (LV-GFP) or GFP and C3 together (LV-C3-GFP). Changes in cell morphology and actin stress fibers were assessed. The vectors were also injected into the anterior chamber of rats, and GFP expression was visualized by a Micron III Retinal Imaging Microscope in vivo and a fluorescence microscope ex vivo. Changes in rat IOP were monitored by using a rebound tonometer and the eyes were evaluated by slit lamp.
Results: LV-mediated C3 expression induced morphologic changes in HTM cells. The cells became retracted and rounded. GFP expression in the anterior chamber angle of rats was observed in vivo from 8 days to 48 days after injection of LV-C3-GFP or LV-GFP. IOP was significantly decreased in the LV-C3-GFP group starting 3 days post injection, and lasting for at least 40 days, when compared to either the contralateral control eyes (the LV-GFP group) or the ipsilateral baseline before injection (P < 0.05). No obvious inflammatory signs were observed in either the LV-C3-GFP or LV-GFP groups.
Conclusions: LV-mediated C3 expression induced changes in morphology of cultured HTM cells. Intracameral injection of LV-C3-GFP lowered rat IOP for at least 40 days. No significant inflammatory reactions were observed in either the LV-C3-GFP or LV-GFP groups. This study supports the possible use of C3 gene therapy for the treatment of glaucoma.

PMID: 30326062 [PubMed - in process]

Effects of Lentivirus-Mediated C3 Expression on Trabecular Meshwork Cells and Intraocular Pressure.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2018 Oct 01;59(12):4937-4944

Authors: Tan J, Fan N, Wang N, Feng B, Yang M, Liu G, Wang Y, Zhu X, Kaufman PL, Pang IH, Liu X

2017

Latanoprostene Bunod 0.024% in Subjects With Open-angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: Pooled Phase 3 Study Findings.

J Glaucoma. 2017 Nov 30;:

Authors: Weinreb RN, Liebmann JM, Martin KR, Kaufman PL, Vittitow JL

Latanoprostene Bunod 0.024% in Subjects With Open-angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: Pooled Phase 3 Study Findings.

J Glaucoma. 2017 Nov 30;:

Authors: Weinreb RN, Liebmann JM, Martin KR, Kaufman PL, Vittitow JL

Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect of latanoprostene bunod (LBN) 0.024% with timolol maleate 0.5% in subjects with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT).
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Pooled analysis of two phase 3, randomized, multicenter, double-masked, parallel-group, noninferiority trials (APOLLO and LUNAR), each with open-label safety extension phases. Adults with OAG or OHT were randomized 2:1 to double-masked treatment with LBN once daily (qd) or timolol twice daily (bid) for 3 months followed by open-label LBN treatment for 3 (LUNAR) or 9 (APOLLO) months. IOP was measured at 8 AM, 12 PM, and 4 PM at week 2, week 6, and months 3, 6, 9, and 12.
RESULTS: Of the 840 subjects randomized, 774 (LBN, n=523; timolol crossover to LBN, n=251) completed the efficacy phase, and 738 completed the safety extension phase. Mean IOP was significantly lower with LBN versus timolol at all 9 evaluation timepoints during the efficacy phase (P<0.001). A significantly greater proportion of LBN-treated subjects attained a mean IOP ≤18 mm Hg and IOP reduction ≥25% from baseline versus timolol-treated subjects (P<0.001). The IOP reduction with LBN was sustained through the safety phase; subjects crossed over from timolol to LBN experienced additional significant IOP lowering (P≤0.009). Both treatments were well tolerated, and there were no safety concerns with long-term LBN treatment.
CONCLUSIONS: In this pooled analysis of subjects with OAG and OHT, LBN 0.024% qd provided greater IOP-lowering compared with timolol 0.5% bid and maintained lowered IOP through 12 months. LBN demonstrated a safety profile comparable to that of prostaglandin analogs.

PMID: 29194198 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Latanoprostene Bunod 0.024% in Subjects With Open-angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: Pooled Phase 3 Study Findings.

J Glaucoma. 2017 Nov 30;:

Authors: Weinreb RN, Liebmann JM, Martin KR, Kaufman PL, Vittitow JL

Related Articles

Change in Diabetic Retinopathy Through 2 Years: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, and Ranibizumab.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2017 Apr 27;:

Authors: Bressler SB, Liu D, Glassman AR, Blodi BA, Castellarin AA, Jampol LM, Kaufman PL, Melia M, Singh H, Wells JA, Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network

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Change in Diabetic Retinopathy Through 2 Years: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, and Ranibizumab.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2017 Apr 27;:

Authors: Bressler SB, Liu D, Glassman AR, Blodi BA, Castellarin AA, Jampol LM, Kaufman PL, Melia M, Singh H, Wells JA, Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network

Abstract
Importance: Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy for diabetic macular edema (DME) favorably affects diabetic retinopathy (DR) improvement and worsening. It is unknown whether these effects differ across anti-VEGF agents.
Objective: To compare changes in DR severity during aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab treatment for DME.
Design, Setting, and Participants: Preplanned secondary analysis of data from a comparative effectiveness trial for center-involved DME was conducted in 650 participants receiving aflibercept, bevacizumab, or ranibizumab. Retinopathy improvement and worsening were determined during 2 years of treatment. Participants were randomized in 2012 through 2013, and the trial concluded on September 23, 2015.
Interventions: Random assignment to aflibercept, 2.0 mg; bevacizumab, 1.25 mg; ranibizumab, 0.3 mg, up to every 4 weeks through 2 years following a retreatment protocol.
Main Outcomes and Measures: Percentages with retinopathy improvement at 1 and 2 years and cumulative probabilities for retinopathy worsening through 2-year without adjustment for multiple outcomes.
Results: A total of 650 participants (495 [76.2%] nonproliferative DR [NPDR], 155 proliferative DR [PDR]) were analyzed; 302 (46.5%) were women and mean (SD) age was 61 (10) years; 425 (65.4%) were white. At 1 year, among 423 NPDR eyes, 44 of 141 (31.2%) treated with aflibercept, 29 of 131 (22.1%) with bevacizumab, and 57of 151 (37.7%) with ranibizumab had improvement of DR severity (adjusted difference: 11.7%; 95% CI, 2.9% to 20.6%; P = .004 for aflibercept vs bevacizumab; 8.9%; 95% CI, 1.7% to 16.1%; P = .01 for ranibizumab vs bevacizumab; and 2.9%; 95% CI, -5.7% to 11.4%; P = .51 for aflibercept vs ranibizumab). At 2 years, 33 eyes (24.8%) in the aflibercept group, 25 eyes (22.1%) in the bevacizumab group, and 40 eyes (31.0%) in the ranibizumab group had DR improvement; no treatment group differences were identified. For 93 eyes with PDR at baseline, 1-year improvement rates were 75.9% for aflibercept, 31.4% for bevacizumab, and 55.2% for ranibizumab (adjusted difference: 50.4%; 95% CI, 26.8% to 74.0%; P < .001 for aflibercept vs bevacizumab; 20.4%; 95% CI, -3.1% to 44.0%; P = .09 for ranibizumab vs bevacizumab; and 30.0%; 95% CI, 4.4% to 55.6%; P = .02 for aflibercept vs ranibizumab). These rates and treatment group differences appeared to be maintained at 2 years. Despite the reduced numbers of injections in the second year, 66 (59.5%) of NPDR and 28 (70.0%) of PDR eyes that manifested improvement at 1 year maintained improvement at 2 years. Two-year cumulative rates for retinopathy worsening ranged from 7.1% to 10.2% and 17.2% to 26.4% among anti-VEGF groups for NPDR and PDR eyes, respectively. No statistically significant treatment differences were noted.
Conclusions and Relevance: At 1 and 2 years, eyes with NPDR receiving anti-VEGF treatment for DME may experience improvement in DR severity. Less improvement was demonstrated with bevacizumab at 1 year than with aflibercept or ranibizumab. Aflibercept was associated with more improvement at 1 and 2 years in the smaller subgroup of participants with PDR at baseline. All 3 anti-VEGF treatments were associated with low rates of DR worsening. These data provide additional outcomes that might be considered when choosing an anti-VEGF agent to treat DME.

PMID: 28448655 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Change in Diabetic Retinopathy Through 2 Years: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, and Ranibizumab.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2017 Apr 27;:

Authors: Bressler SB, Liu D, Glassman AR, Blodi BA, Castellarin AA, Jampol LM, Kaufman PL, Melia M, Singh H, Wells JA, Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network

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Latanoprostene bunod ophthalmic solution 0.024% for IOP lowering in glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2017 Mar;18(4):433-444

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Latanoprostene bunod ophthalmic solution 0.024% for IOP lowering in glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2017 Mar;18(4):433-444

Authors: Kaufman PL

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering has been demonstrated to slow the progression or onset of visual field loss in open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT). Pharmacological lowering of IOP is the most common initial intervention in patients with OAG or OHT, however, many patients will require more than one therapy to achieve target IOP. Latanoprostene bunod is a novel nitric oxide (NO)-donating prostaglandin F2α analog for the reduction of IOP. Areas covered: Current knowledge concerning the mechanism of action of latanoprostene bunod is presented. Additionally, clinical safety and efficacy data from published Phase 1 (KRONUS), Phase 2 (VOYAGER, CONSTELLATION) and Phase 3 (APOLLO, LUNAR, JUPITER) studies are reviewed. Expert opinion: Latanoprostene bunod is a dual mechanism, dual pathway molecule, consisting of latanoprost acid, which is known to enhance uveoscleral (unconventional) outflow by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase expression and remodeling of the ciliary muscle's extracellular matrix, linked to an NO-donating moiety, which enhances trabecular meshwork/Schlemm's canal (conventional) outflow by inducing cytoskeletal relaxation via the soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (sGC-cGMP) signaling pathway. Latanoprostene bunod 0.024% solution applied topically once daily appears more effective in reducing IOP in OHT and OAG subjects than either latanoprost or timolol, with a side effect profile similar to that of latanoprost.

PMID: 28234563 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Latanoprostene bunod ophthalmic solution 0.024% for IOP lowering in glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2017 Mar;18(4):433-444

Authors: Kaufman PL

2016

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Age-related posterior ciliary muscle restriction - A link between trabecular meshwork and optic nerve head pathophysiology.

Exp Eye Res. 2016 Jul 22;

Authors: Croft MA, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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Age-related posterior ciliary muscle restriction - A link between trabecular meshwork and optic nerve head pathophysiology.

Exp Eye Res. 2016 Jul 22;

Authors: Croft MA, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

Abstract
The ciliary muscle plays a major role in controlling both accommodation and outflow facility in primates. The ciliary muscle and the choroid functionally form an elastic network that extends from the trabecular meshwork all the way to the back of the eye and ultimately attaches to the elastic fiber ring that surrounds the optic nerve and to the lamina cribrosa through which the nerve passes. The ciliary muscle governs the accommodative movement of the elastic network. With age ciliary muscle mobility is restricted by progressively inelastic posterior attachments and the posterior restriction makes the contraction progressively isometric; placing increased tension on the optic nerve region. In addition, outflow facility also declines with age and limbal corneoscleral contour bows inward. Age-related loss in muscle movement and altered limbal corneoscleral contour could both compromise the basal function of the trabecular meshwork. Further, recent studies in non-human primates show that the central vitreous moves posteriorly all the way back to the optic nerve region, suggesting a fluid current and a pressure gradient toward the optic nerve. Thus, there may be pressure and tension spikes on the optic nerve region during accommodation and these pressure and tension spikes may increase with age. This constellation of events could be relevant to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In summary, our hypothesis is that glaucoma and presbyopia may be literally linked to each other, via the choroid, and that damage to the optic nerve may be inflicted by accommodative intraocular pressure and choroidal tension "spikes", which may increase with age.

PMID: 27453343 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Age-related posterior ciliary muscle restriction - A link between trabecular meshwork and optic nerve head pathophysiology.

Exp Eye Res. 2016 Jul 22;

Authors: Croft MA, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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Accommodative movements of the lens/capsule and the strand that extends between the posterior vitreous zonule insertion zone & the lens equator, in relation to the vitreous face and aging.

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 2016 Jan;36(1):21-32

Authors: Croft MA, Heatley G, McDonald JP, Katz A, Kaufman PL

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Accommodative movements of the lens/capsule and the strand that extends between the posterior vitreous zonule insertion zone & the lens equator, in relation to the vitreous face and aging.

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 2016 Jan;36(1):21-32

Authors: Croft MA, Heatley G, McDonald JP, Katz A, Kaufman PL

Abstract
PURPOSE: To elucidate the dynamic accommodative movements of the lens capsule, posterior lens and the strand that attaches to the posterior vitreous zonule insertion zone and posterior lens equator (PVZ INS-LE), and their age-related changes.
METHODS: Twelve human subjects (ages 19-65 years) and 12 rhesus monkeys (ages 6-27 years) were studied. Accommodation was induced pharmacologically (humans) or by central electrical stimulation (monkeys). Ultrasound biomicroscopy was used to image intraocular structures in both species. Surgical procedures and contrast agents were utilized in the monkey eyes to elucidate function and allow visualization of the intraocular accommodative structures.
RESULTS: Human: The posterior pole of the lens moves posteriorly during accommodation in proportion to accommodative amplitude and ciliary muscle movement. Monkey: Similar accommodative movements of the posterior lens pole were seen in the monkey eyes. Following extracapsular lens extraction (ECLE), the central capsule bows backward during accommodation in proportion to accommodative amplitude and ciliary muscle movement, while the peripheral capsule moves forward. During accommodation the ciliary muscle moved forward by ~1.0 mm, pulling forward the vitreous zonule and the PVZ INS-LE structure. During the accommodative response the PVZ INS-LE structure moved forward when the lens was intact and when the lens substance and capsule were removed. In both the monkey and the human eyes these movements declined with age.
CONCLUSIONS: The accommodative shape change of the central capsule may be due to the elastic properties of the capsule itself. For these capsule/lens accommodative posterior movements to occur, the vitreous face must either allow for it or facilitate it. The PVZ INS-LE structure may act as a 'strut' to the posterior lens equator (pushing the lens equator forward) and thereby facilitate accommodative forward lens equator movement and lens thickening. The age-related posterior restriction of the ciliary muscle, vitreous zonule and the PVZ-INS LE structure dampens the accommodative lens shape change. Future descriptions of the accommodative mechanism, and approaches to presbyopia therapy, may need to incorporate these findings.

PMID: 26769326 [PubMed - in process]

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Accommodative movements of the lens/capsule and the strand that extends between the posterior vitreous zonule insertion zone & the lens equator, in relation to the vitreous face and aging.

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 2016 Jan;36(1):21-32

Authors: Croft MA, Heatley G, McDonald JP, Katz A, Kaufman PL

2015

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A randomised, controlled comparison of latanoprostene bunod and latanoprost 0.005% in the treatment of ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma: the VOYAGER study.

Br J Ophthalmol. 2015 Jun;99(6):738-45

Authors: Weinreb RN, Ong T, Scassellati Sforzolini B, Vittitow JL, Singh K, Kaufman PL, VOYAGER study group

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A randomised, controlled comparison of latanoprostene bunod and latanoprost 0.005% in the treatment of ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma: the VOYAGER study.

Br J Ophthalmol. 2015 Jun;99(6):738-45

Authors: Weinreb RN, Ong T, Scassellati Sforzolini B, Vittitow JL, Singh K, Kaufman PL, VOYAGER study group

Abstract
AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of latanoprostene bunod (LBN) compared with latanoprost 0.005%, and to determine the optimum drug concentration(s) of LBN in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in subjects with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
METHODS: Randomised, investigator-masked, parallel-group, dose-ranging study. Subjects instilled one drop of study medication in the study eye once daily each evening for 28 days and completed five study visits. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction in mean diurnal IOP at Day 28.
RESULTS: Of the 413 subjects randomised (LBN 0.006%, n=82; LBN 0.012%, n=85; LBN 0.024%, n=83; LBN 0.040%, n=81; latanoprost, n=82), 396 subjects completed the study. Efficacy for LBN was dose-dependent reaching a plateau at 0.024%-0.040%. LBN 0.024% led to significantly greater reductions in diurnal IOP compared with latanoprost at the primary endpoint, Day 28 (p=0.005), as well as Days 7 (p=0.033) and 14 (p=0.015). The incidence of adverse events, mostly mild and transient, was numerically higher in the LBN treatment groups compared with the latanoprost group. Hyperaemia was similar across treatments.
CONCLUSIONS: LBN 0.024% dosed once daily was the lower of the two most effective concentrations evaluated, with significantly greater IOP lowering and comparable side effects relative to latanoprost 0.005%. LBN dosed once daily for 28 days was well tolerated.
CLINICAL TRIAL NUMBER: NCT01223378.

PMID: 25488946 [PubMed - in process]

Related Articles

A randomised, controlled comparison of latanoprostene bunod and latanoprost 0.005% in the treatment of ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma: the VOYAGER study.

Br J Ophthalmol. 2015 Jun;99(6):738-45

Authors: Weinreb RN, Ong T, Scassellati Sforzolini B, Vittitow JL, Singh K, Kaufman PL, VOYAGER study group

2014

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Neuroprotective effects of C3 exoenzyme in excitotoxic retinopathy.

Exp Eye Res. 2014 Aug;125:128-34

Authors: Wang Y, Wang Y, Yang Q, Guo L, Yin Y, Fan N, Zhou X, Cai SP, Kaufman PL, Liu X

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Neuroprotective effects of C3 exoenzyme in excitotoxic retinopathy.

Exp Eye Res. 2014 Aug;125:128-34

Authors: Wang Y, Wang Y, Yang Q, Guo L, Yin Y, Fan N, Zhou X, Cai SP, Kaufman PL, Liu X

Abstract
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of C3 exoenzyme (C3) on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced retinopathy in rats. C3 was expressed in Escherichia. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Immunofluorescence was performed in NIH 3T3 cells treated with C3 to verify the cellular uptake of the protein. NMDA was injected intravitreally into rat eyes with or without C3. At various time points after injection, eyes were enucleated. Hematoxylin/eosin staining was performed on retina cross-sections for morphological analysis. Survival and apoptosis of cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) were assessed by cresyl violet staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) on retina flat-mounts. RhoA levels in retina cells were evaluated by Western blot to detect C3 uptake in vivo. The cellular uptake of C3 was verified by immunofluorescence. Damage including a decrease in inner plexiform layer (IPL) thickness and reduction of cell density in the GCL, corresponding to apoptosis of neurons, was induced by intravitreal injection of NMDA. Protection against this damage was observed following co-injection of C3 and NMDA. RhoA ADP-ribosylation induced by C3 was confirmed by Western blot. Our results suggest that C3 exerts neuroprotective effects against excitotoxic damage induced by NMDA.

PMID: 24928315 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Neuroprotective effects of C3 exoenzyme in excitotoxic retinopathy.

Exp Eye Res. 2014 Aug;125:128-34

Authors: Wang Y, Wang Y, Yang Q, Guo L, Yin Y, Fan N, Zhou X, Cai SP, Kaufman PL, Liu X

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Morphological alterations within the peripheral fixation of the iris dilator muscle in eyes with pigmentary glaucoma.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Jul;55(7):4541-51

Authors: Flügel-Koch CM, Tektas OY, Kaufman PL, Paulsen FP, Lütjen-Drecoll E

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Morphological alterations within the peripheral fixation of the iris dilator muscle in eyes with pigmentary glaucoma.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Jul;55(7):4541-51

Authors: Flügel-Koch CM, Tektas OY, Kaufman PL, Paulsen FP, Lütjen-Drecoll E

Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the peripheral fixation of the iris dilator muscle in normal eyes and in eyes with pigmentary glaucoma (PG).
METHODS: Using 63 control eyes (age 18 months-99 years), the peripheral iris dilator was investigated by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Development was studied using 18 differently aged fetal eyes stained immunohistochemically against α-smooth muscle (SM) actin. The peripheral iris dilator muscle in PG was analyzed using semithin and ultrathin sections of six glutaraldehyde-fixed eyes from three donors aged 38, 62, and 74 years.
RESULTS: In normal eyes, the peripheral end of the iris dilator muscle is arranged in a sphincter-like manner. Arcade-shaped tendinous connections associated with myofibroblasts (iridial strands) anchor the iris dilator within the elastic-fibromuscular ciliary meshwork that also serves as fixation area for the elastic tendons of the inner ciliary muscle portions. The iridial strands are innervated and can adapt their length during accommodation. The PG eyes show incomplete circular bundles and iridial strands that are mainly anchored to the iris stroma and the flexible uveal parts of the trabecular meshwork.
CONCLUSIONS: The normal anchorage of the peripheral iris dilator and its presumably neuronally regulated length adaptation stabilize the peripheral iris during accommodation. Insufficient fixation in PG could promote posterior bowing of the iris with rubbing against the zonular fibers and pigment liberation from the iris pigmented epithelium.

PMID: 24938519 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Morphological alterations within the peripheral fixation of the iris dilator muscle in eyes with pigmentary glaucoma.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 Jul;55(7):4541-51

Authors: Flügel-Koch CM, Tektas OY, Kaufman PL, Paulsen FP, Lütjen-Drecoll E

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The trabecular meshwork in normal eyes and in exfoliation glaucoma.

J Glaucoma. 2014 Oct-Nov;23(8 Suppl 1):S15-9

Authors: Rasmussen CA, Kaufman PL

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The trabecular meshwork in normal eyes and in exfoliation glaucoma.

J Glaucoma. 2014 Oct-Nov;23(8 Suppl 1):S15-9

Authors: Rasmussen CA, Kaufman PL

Abstract
Trabecular meshwork (TM) and ciliary muscle contraction and relaxation function together to provide control of outflow. The active role the TM plays in the regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is mediated by cytoskeletal and contractility mechanisms as well as signal/transduction factors that mediate its response to stressors. This complex system is altered with age and the glaucomas, and it can be difficult to differentiate between the various etiological effects/agents. Factors such as a compromised antioxidant defense system and altered extracellular matrix metabolism are known to contribute to impaired outflow and may be common to primary open-angle glaucoma, exfoliation syndrome, and exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). Genes differentially expressed in diseased ocular tissue or in cultured HTM cell models, and thus implicated in the disease process, include SOD2, ALDH1A1, MGST1, LOX, and LOXL1, elements of the transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenetic protein/SMAD signaling pathways, connective tissue growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2, a tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases also known as TIMP-2, and endothelin-1 (ET-1). In exfoliation syndrome and XFG fibrillar, proteinaceous extracellular material is produced in excess and accumulates in both outflow pathways but does not always lead to elevated IOP. Locally produced material may accumulate in the intertrabecular spaces, juxtacanalicular (JCT) meshwork, and the inner wall of Schlemm's canal as a result of a combination of both excessive synthesis and insufficient degradation. An increase in JCT plaque and decreased cellularity in the TM are thought to contribute to decreased outflow facility in glaucoma patients, but XFG patient specimens show reduced extracellular plaque material in the JCT, and the structural integrity of trabecular endothelial cells is mostly retained and cellularity remains unchanged. The distinctions between causes/effects of structural changes leading to reduced outflow/elevated IOP are important for developing effective, individualized treatment strategies.

PMID: 25275898 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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The trabecular meshwork in normal eyes and in exfoliation glaucoma.

J Glaucoma. 2014 Oct-Nov;23(8 Suppl 1):S15-9

Authors: Rasmussen CA, Kaufman PL

2013

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Remembering Bernard Becker, MD, 1920-2013.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Dec;54(13):7885-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Remembering Bernard Becker, MD, 1920-2013.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Dec;54(13):7885-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

PMID: 24296514 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Remembering Bernard Becker, MD, 1920-2013.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Dec;54(13):7885-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Effect of nitric oxide on anterior segment physiology in monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5103-10

Authors: Heyne GW, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, Gabelt BT

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Effect of nitric oxide on anterior segment physiology in monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5103-10

Authors: Heyne GW, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, Gabelt BT

Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the effect of the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-nitro-arginine-methylester (L-NAME), on IOP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), pupil diameter (PD), refraction (Rfx), aqueous humor formation (AHF), and outflow facility (OF) in monkeys.
METHODS: Monkeys were treated with single or multiple topical treatments of 500 μg SNP or L-NAME to one eye. IOP was determined by Goldmann applanation tonometry, PD with vernier calipers in room light, Rfx by Hartinger coincidence refractometry, AHF by fluorophotometry, and MAP with a blood pressure monitor. OF was determined by two-level constant pressure perfusion following anterior chamber exchange.
RESULTS: Following four topical treatments with 500 μg SNP, 30 minutes apart, IOP was significantly decreased from 2 to 6 hours compared with the contralateral control with the maximum IOP reduction of 20% at 3 hours (P < 0.001). PD, Rfx, and AHF were unchanged. Effects on MAP were variable. OF after SNP exchange was significantly increased by 77% (P < 0.05) at 10(-3) M. Topical L-NAME had no effect on IOP, PD, Rfx, or MAP.
CONCLUSIONS: Enhancement of nitric oxide concentration at targeted tissues in the anterior segment may be a useful approach for IOP reduction for glaucoma therapy. Additional studies are warranted before conclusions can be made regarding the effect of NOS inhibition on ocular physiology in nonhuman primates.

PMID: 23800771 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Effect of nitric oxide on anterior segment physiology in monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5103-10

Authors: Heyne GW, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, Gabelt BT

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Accommodative movements of the vitreous membrane, choroid, and sclera in young and presbyopic human and nonhuman primate eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5049-58

Authors: Croft MA, Nork TM, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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Accommodative movements of the vitreous membrane, choroid, and sclera in young and presbyopic human and nonhuman primate eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5049-58

Authors: Croft MA, Nork TM, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

Abstract
PURPOSE: We report, for the first time to our knowledge, dynamic movements of the vitreous membrane and peripheral choroid during accommodation, and age-related changes in the anterior sclera.
METHODS: We studied 11 rhesus monkeys (ages 6-27 years) and 12 human subjects (ages 19-65 years). Accommodation was induced pharmacologically in human subjects and by central electrical stimulation in the monkeys. Ultrasound biomicroscopy, endoscopy, and contrast agents were used to image various intraocular structures.
RESULTS: In the monkey, the anterior hyaloid membrane bows backward during accommodation in proportion to accommodative amplitude and lens thickening. A cleft exists between the pars plicata region and the anterior hyaloid membrane, and the cleft width increases during accommodation from 0.79 ± 0.01 mm to 1.01 ± 0.02 mm in young eyes (n = 2, P < 0.005), as fluid from the anterior chamber flows around the lens equator toward the cleft. In the older eyes the cleft width was 0.30 ± 0.19 mm, which during accommodation increased to 0.45 ± 0.20 mm (n = 2). During accommodation the ciliary muscle moved forward by approximately 1.0 mm, pulling forward the choroid, retina, vitreous zonule, and the neighboring vitreous interconnected with the vitreous zonule. Among the humans, in the older eyes the scleral contour bowed inward in the region of the limbus, compared to the young eyes.
CONCLUSIONS: The monkey anterior hyaloid bends posteriorly during accommodation in proportion to accommodative amplitude and the sclera bows inward with increasing age in both species. Future descriptions of the accommodative mechanism, and approaches to presbyopia therapy, may need to incorporate these findings.

PMID: 23745005 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Accommodative movements of the vitreous membrane, choroid, and sclera in young and presbyopic human and nonhuman primate eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5049-58

Authors: Croft MA, Nork TM, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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Extralenticular and lenticular aspects of accommodation and presbyopia in human versus monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5035-48

Authors: Croft MA, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lin TL, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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Extralenticular and lenticular aspects of accommodation and presbyopia in human versus monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5035-48

Authors: Croft MA, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lin TL, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine if the accommodative forward movements of the vitreous zonule and lens equator occur in the human eye, as they do in the rhesus monkey eye; to investigate the connection between the vitreous zonule posterior insertion zone and the posterior lens equator; and to determine which components-muscle apex width, lens thickness, lens equator position, vitreous zonule, circumlental space, and/or other intraocular dimensions, including those stated in the objectives above-are most important in predicting accommodative amplitude and presbyopia.
METHODS: Accommodation was induced pharmacologically in 12 visually normal human subjects (ages 19-65 years) and by midbrain electrical stimulation in 11 rhesus monkeys (ages 6-27 years). Ultrasound biomicroscopy imaged the entire ciliary body, anterior and posterior lens surfaces, and the zonule. Relevant distances were measured in the resting and accommodated eyes. Stepwise regression analysis determined which variables were the most important predictors.
RESULTS: The human vitreous zonule and lens equator move forward (anteriorly) during accommodation, and their movements decline with age, as in the monkey. Over all ages studied, age could explain accommodative amplitude, but not as well as accommodative lens thickening and resting muscle apex thickness did together. Accommodative change in distances between the vitreous zonule insertion zone and the posterior lens equator or muscle apex were important for predicting accommodative lens thickening.
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings quantify the movements of the zonule and ciliary muscle during accommodation, and identify their age-related changes that could impact the optical change that occurs during accommodation and IOL function.

PMID: 23745002 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Extralenticular and lenticular aspects of accommodation and presbyopia in human versus monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013 Jul;54(7):5035-48

Authors: Croft MA, McDonald JP, Katz A, Lin TL, Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL

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A Potential Application of Canaloplasty in Glaucoma Gene Therapy.

Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2013 Jan 31;2(1)

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

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A Potential Application of Canaloplasty in Glaucoma Gene Therapy.

Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2013 Jan 31;2(1)

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

Abstract
Canaloplasty, a recently developed non-penetrating glaucoma surgical approach, may restore physiological outflow routes in primary open-angle glaucoma with less risk of severe postoperative complications than trabeculectomy. Since the inner wall of Schlemm's canal (SC) is directly in contact with the trabecular meshwork (TM) for 360 degrees and the catheter device used in canaloplasty allows viscoelastic to be injected into the entire length of SC, canaloplasty might also be used to perform SC/TM-targeted delivery of transgene vectors for glaucoma gene therapy. This hypothesized new method for transgene delivery may give the transgene access to the entire inner wall of SC and the whole juxtacanalicular region of the TM and allow the transgene to be expressed in both the TM and SC without affecting the cornea, iris and ciliary body. Further, this strategy might have a greater trabecular outflow resistance-decreasing effect than either the genetic or surgical approach alone.

PMID: 23888250 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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A Potential Application of Canaloplasty in Glaucoma Gene Therapy.

Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2013 Jan 31;2(1)

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

2012

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Iovs 2008-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Dec;53(13):8238-9

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Iovs 2008-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Dec;53(13):8238-9

Authors: Kaufman PL

PMID: 23230304 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Iovs 2008-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Dec;53(13):8238-9

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Imaging and measurement in the eye: now and ahead.

Optom Vis Sci. 2012 May;89(5):521-3

Authors: Read SA, Williams DR, Wojtkowski M, Roorda A, Nichols JJ, Mutti DO, Kaufman PL, Carney LG

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Imaging and measurement in the eye: now and ahead.

Optom Vis Sci. 2012 May;89(5):521-3

Authors: Read SA, Williams DR, Wojtkowski M, Roorda A, Nichols JJ, Mutti DO, Kaufman PL, Carney LG

PMID: 22555666 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Imaging and measurement in the eye: now and ahead.

Optom Vis Sci. 2012 May;89(5):521-3

Authors: Read SA, Williams DR, Wojtkowski M, Roorda A, Nichols JJ, Mutti DO, Kaufman PL, Carney LG

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Comparisons of actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors as potential antiglaucoma medications.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;7(2):177-187

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

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Comparisons of actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors as potential antiglaucoma medications.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;7(2):177-187

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

Abstract
Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in the trabecular meshwork play a crucial role in the regulation of trabecular outflow resistance. The actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors affect the dynamics of the actomyosin system by either disrupting the actin filaments or inhibiting the Rho kinase-activated cellular contractility. Both approaches induce similar morphological changes and resistance decreases in the trabecular outflow pathway, and thus both have potential as antiglaucoma medications. Although the drugs might induce detrimental changes in the cornea following topical administration, lower drug concentrations in larger volumes as used clinically, but not higher drug concentrations in smaller volumes as used experimentally, could minimize corneal toxicity. Additionally, developments of trabecular meshwork-specific actin filament disruptors or Rho kinase inhibitors, prodrugs and new drug-delivery methods might avoid the drugs' toxicity to the cornea. Gene therapies with cytoskeleton-modulating proteins may mimic the effects of the cytoskeleton-modulating agents and have the potential to permanently decrease trabecular outflow resistance.

PMID: 22737177 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Comparisons of actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors as potential antiglaucoma medications.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;7(2):177-187

Authors: Tian B, Kaufman PL

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Remembering Joanne Angle, 1941-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2446-7

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Remembering Joanne Angle, 1941-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2446-7

Authors: Kaufman PL

PMID: 22532367 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Remembering Joanne Angle, 1941-2012.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012 Apr;53(4):2446-7

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Cytoskeletal drugs prevent posterior capsular opacification in human lens capsule in vitro.

Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;250(4):507-14

Authors: Sureshkumar J, Haripriya A, Muthukkaruppan V, Kaufman PL, Tian B

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Cytoskeletal drugs prevent posterior capsular opacification in human lens capsule in vitro.

Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;250(4):507-14

Authors: Sureshkumar J, Haripriya A, Muthukkaruppan V, Kaufman PL, Tian B

Abstract
BACKGROUND: To determine whether the cytoskeletal drugs H-7 and Latrunculin B (LAT-B) inhibit posterior capsular opacification (PCO) in the cultured human lens capsular bag.
METHODS: Following extracapsular cataract (lens) extraction in human donor eyes, the capsular bag was prepared and cultured by standard techniques. Forty-eight capsular bags were studied, of which 13 were treated with H-7 (50, 100 or 300 μM), 12 with 1% BSS (vehicle of H-7), 11 with LAT-B (2, 5 or 10 μM), and 12 with 0.25% DMSO (vehicle of LAT-B). Forty out of the 48 capsular bags were from paired eyes of 20 donors, with one bag being treated with H-7/LAT-B and the other with BSS/DMSO for each pair, including 20 for the H-7-BSS protocol and 20 for the LAT-B-DMSO protocol. The medium with the cytoskeletal drug/vehicle was replaced every 3-4 days for 4 weeks. PCO was assessed daily using inverted phase-contrast microscopy, and scored on a 4-point scale.
RESULTS: In all cultures with BSS or DMSO, residual lens epithelial cells (LECs) on the anterior capsule migrated to and proliferated on the posterior capsule by 3-7 days, and apparent LEC growth on the posterior capsule with severe capsular wrinkling (PCO Grade 3) was seen by 2-3 weeks. When treated continuously with H-7 or LAT-B, the migration and proliferation of LECs and the capsular wrinkling were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, with the inhibition being complete (PCO Grade 0) in the 300 μM H-7 (n = 8, p < 0.001) or 10 μM LAT-B culture (n = 3, p = 0.002).
CONCLUSION: H-7 and LAT-B dose-dependently inhibited PCO formation in the cultured human lens capsular bags, suggesting that cytoskeletal drugs might prevent PCO formation after surgery in the human eye.

PMID: 22138731 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Cytoskeletal drugs prevent posterior capsular opacification in human lens capsule in vitro.

Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2012 Apr;250(4):507-14

Authors: Sureshkumar J, Haripriya A, Muthukkaruppan V, Kaufman PL, Tian B

2011

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Glaucoma research community and FDA look to the future, II: NEI/FDA Glaucoma Clinical Trial Design and Endpoints Symposium: measures of structural change and visual function.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Oct;52(11):7842-51

Authors: Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL

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Glaucoma research community and FDA look to the future, II: NEI/FDA Glaucoma Clinical Trial Design and Endpoints Symposium: measures of structural change and visual function.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Oct;52(11):7842-51

Authors: Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL

PMID: 21972262 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Glaucoma research community and FDA look to the future, II: NEI/FDA Glaucoma Clinical Trial Design and Endpoints Symposium: measures of structural change and visual function.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Oct;52(11):7842-51

Authors: Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL

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Relationship of aqueous outflow resistance to age and total volume perfused in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Aug;52(9):6820-4

Authors: Kiland JA, Gabelt BT, Kaufman PL

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Relationship of aqueous outflow resistance to age and total volume perfused in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Aug;52(9):6820-4

Authors: Kiland JA, Gabelt BT, Kaufman PL

Abstract
PURPOSE: The effect of total volume perfused on outflow resistance (the reciprocal of outflow facility) and the effect of age on the rate of change in resistance as a function of total volume were determined in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys.
METHODS: Outflow facility was measured under general anesthesia by two-level constant pressure perfusion in one eye of 22 rhesus and 17 cynomolgus monkeys (ranging in age, respectively, from 4 to 25 and from 3 to 12 years). Total volume perfused was calculated from data obtained during the perfusion.
RESULTS: Resistance decreased in both cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys as total volume perfused increased (-0.085 ± 0.021 and -0.022 ± 0.011 mm Hg/μL/min/μL(tot); P = 0.001 and P = 0.047, respectively). Rate of change in resistance significantly increased in cynomolgus monkeys as total volume perfused increased (0.0018 ± 0.0.0007 mm Hg/μL/min/μL(tot), P = 0.033); however, this was not the case in rhesus monkeys. After accounting for total volume perfused, the rate of change in resistance significantly decreased with increasing age in rhesus monkeys (-0.0068 ± 0.0026 [mm Hg/μL/min]/μL(tot)/y, P = 0.017). There was no significant difference in rate of change in resistance with age, after accounting for total volume, in the cynomolgus monkeys.
CONCLUSIONS: The present study supports previous findings indicating that total washout is largely dependent on perfusion volume. However, in populations with old/elderly animals, such as our rhesus group, we found that age does play a significant role in rate of change in resistance, and may be an even more important factor to consider in the rate of resistance change than volume perfused in aged animals.

PMID: 21757583 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Relationship of aqueous outflow resistance to age and total volume perfused in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2011 Aug;52(9):6820-4

Authors: Kiland JA, Gabelt BT, Kaufman PL

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Evaluation of rebound tonometry in non-human primates.

Exp Eye Res. 2011 Apr;92(4):268-73

Authors: Elsmo EJ, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, McLellan GJ

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Evaluation of rebound tonometry in non-human primates.

Exp Eye Res. 2011 Apr;92(4):268-73

Authors: Elsmo EJ, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, McLellan GJ

Abstract
To determine the accuracy and reproducibility of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements obtained with the TonoVet® rebound tonometer in cynomolgus macaques and to determine the effects of corneal thickness on measurements obtained by the TonoVet®. The anterior chambers of both eyes of anesthetized monkeys were cannulated with branched 23-G needles; one branch was connected to a vertically adjustable reservoir and the other to a pressure transducer. IOP was increased by 5 mmHg increments and then decreased by 10 mmHg decrements. IOP was measured using the TonoVet® at each increment and decrement by 2 independent observers and at every other increment and every decrement by a single observer using 'minified' Goldmann applanation tonometry. Central corneal thickness was measured with a PachPen(TM) ultrasonic pachymeter. TonoVet® readings correlated well with manometric IOP (slope = 0.972, r(2) coefficient = 0.955). No significant differences were observed when comparing eyes or operators; however there was a non-significant trend for TonoVet® readings taken in right eyes to be closer to manometric IOP than those taken in left eyes. The TonoVet® had a non-significant tendency to underestimate manometric IOP. TonoVet® readings obtained during the decremental phase of the experiment were significantly closer (p < 0.004) to manometric IOP than those obtained during the incremental phase. Central corneal thickness significantly increased (p < 0.0001) over the course of the experiment. The TonoVet® rebound tonometer is a reliable and accurate tool for the measurement of IOP in cynomolgus macaques. This tonometer has several advantages, including portability, ease of use, and brief contact with the corneal surface making topical anesthetics unnecessary.

PMID: 21315069 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Evaluation of rebound tonometry in non-human primates.

Exp Eye Res. 2011 Apr;92(4):268-73

Authors: Elsmo EJ, Kiland JA, Kaufman PL, McLellan GJ

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Dendrite plasticity in the lateral geniculate nucleus in primate glaucoma.

Vision Res. 2011 Jan 28;51(2):243-50

Authors: Ly T, Gupta N, Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL, Yücel YH

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Dendrite plasticity in the lateral geniculate nucleus in primate glaucoma.

Vision Res. 2011 Jan 28;51(2):243-50

Authors: Ly T, Gupta N, Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL, Yücel YH

Abstract
Neural degeneration in glaucoma involves retinal ganglion cells and neurons of their major target, the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Dendrites of relay LGN neurons projecting to the visual cortex were studied by immunocytochemical and quantitative Sholl analysis in combination with confocal microscopy and 3D-morphometry. In non-human adult primate glaucoma, relay LGN neurons showed reduced dendrite complexity and length, and these changes were modified by NMDA receptor blockade. Dendrite plasticity of LGN relay neurons in adult primate glaucoma has implications for potential disease modification by treatment interventions.

PMID: 20692280 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Dendrite plasticity in the lateral geniculate nucleus in primate glaucoma.

Vision Res. 2011 Jan 28;51(2):243-50

Authors: Ly T, Gupta N, Weinreb RN, Kaufman PL, Yücel YH

2010

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Effect of H-7 on secondary cataract after phacoemulsification in the live rabbit eye.

J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Dec;26(6):533-9

Authors: Tian B, Heatley GA, Filla MS, Kaufman PL

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Effect of H-7 on secondary cataract after phacoemulsification in the live rabbit eye.

J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Dec;26(6):533-9

Authors: Tian B, Heatley GA, Filla MS, Kaufman PL

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study is aimed to determine if the serine-threonine kinase inhibitor H-7 inhibits secondary cataract after phacoemulsification in the live rabbit eye.
METHODS: Eighteen rabbits underwent extracapsular lens extraction by phacoemulsification in 1 eye. The eye was treated with intravitreal H-7 (300 or 1,200 μM; n = 6 or 5) or balanced salt solution (BSS) (n = 7) immediately after the surgery and twice weekly for 10 weeks. Each eye received slit lamp biomicroscopy once a week, during which posterior capsule opacification (PCO) was evaluated. The eye was then enucleated and the lens capsule was prepared, fixed, and imaged. PCO was evaluated again on the isolated lens capsule under a phase microscope. Soemmering's ring area (SRA) and the entire lens capsule area were measured from capsule images on a computer and the percentage of SRA (PSRA) in the entire capsule area was calculated. Wet weight of the capsule (WW) was determined on a balance.
RESULTS: No significant difference in PCO was observed in any comparison. No significant differences in SRA, PSRA, and WW were observed between the 300 μM H-7-treated eye and the BSS-treated eye. However, SRA, PSRA, and WW in the 1,200 μM H-7-treated eye were significantly smaller than those in the BSS-treated eye [28.3 ± 16.2 vs. 61.4 ± 8.86 mm(2) (P = 0.001), 33% ± 20% vs. 65% ± 15% (P = 0.01), and 65.6 ± 27.9 vs. 127.0 ±37.3 mg (P = 0.01)].
CONCLUSIONS: Intravitreal H-7 (1,200 μM) significantly inhibits Soemmering's ring formation in the live rabbit eye, suggesting that agents that inhibit the actomyosin system in cells may prevent secondary cataract after phacoemulsification.

PMID: 21029019 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Effect of H-7 on secondary cataract after phacoemulsification in the live rabbit eye.

J Ocul Pharmacol Ther. 2010 Dec;26(6):533-9

Authors: Tian B, Heatley GA, Filla MS, Kaufman PL

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Sodium orthovanadate effect on outflow facility and intraocular pressure in live monkeys.

Exp Eye Res. 2010 Oct;91(4):486-90

Authors: Tan JC, Kiland JA, Gonzalez JM, Gabelt BT, Peters DM, Kaufman PL

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Sodium orthovanadate effect on outflow facility and intraocular pressure in live monkeys.

Exp Eye Res. 2010 Oct;91(4):486-90

Authors: Tan JC, Kiland JA, Gonzalez JM, Gabelt BT, Peters DM, Kaufman PL

Abstract
Sodium orthovanadate (Na(3)VO(4)) is reported to reduce IOP by affecting aqueous formation, but whether it also affects outflow facility (OF) is unclear. We tested the effect of Na(3)VO(4) on OF and intraocular pressure (IOP) in live cynomolgus monkeys, and on actin and cell adhesion organization in cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. Total OF (n = 12) was measured by 2-level constant pressure perfusion of the monkey anterior chamber (AC) before and after exchange with 1 mM Na(3)VO(4) or vehicle in opposite eyes. Topical 1% Na(3)VO(4) or vehicle only was given twice daily (each 2 × 20 μL drops) for 4 days to opposite eyes (n = 8), and Goldmann IOP was measured before and hourly after treatment for 6 h on Days 1 and 4. Filamentous actin and vinculin-containing cell adhesions were examined by epifluorescence microscopy after the cells had been incubated with 1 mM Na(3)VO(4) for 24 h. A) In monkeys, Na(3)VO(4) increased OF by 29.3 ± 8.8% (mean ± s.e.m.) over the perfusion interval when adjusted for baseline and contralateral eye washout (p = 0.01; n = 12). B) Day 1 baseline IOP was 16.2 ± 1.5 mmHg in treated eyes and 15.9 ± 1.3 mmHg in the contralateral control eyes. Following treatment on Day 1, IOP was no different (p > 0.05) between treated eyes and control eyes at any time-point or compared to baseline. Day 4 mean IOP averaged over hours 2-6 was 13.5 ± 0.8 mmHg in treated eyes and 16.1 ± 0.2 mmHg in control eyes. Treated eye IOP was lower than its Day 4 baseline (p < 0.005), lower than control eyes for the same Day 4 interval (p = 0.009), and lower than the Day 1 baseline (p = 0.0000). Control eye IOP on Day 4 was not significantly different from baseline on Day 1. C) Incubation of HTM cells with 1 mM Na(3)VO(4) for 24 h caused a loss of actin stress fibers and vinculin-containing adhesions. Cell retraction and separation was also observed in vanadate-treated cultures. Reformation of actin stress fibers, vinculin-containing adhesions and confluent monolayers occurred within 24 h after Na(3)VO(4)-containing culture medium was replaced with Na(3)VO(4)-free medium. Ocular administration of Na(3)VO(4) to live monkeys significantly increases OF and reduces IOP. Na(3)VO(4) reversibly disrupts actin and cell adhesion organization and causes retraction and separation of cultured HTM cells. Na(3)VO(4) increases pressure-dependent outflow in live monkeys. Altered actin architecture in the TM may play a part in this increased OF.

PMID: 20620138 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Sodium orthovanadate effect on outflow facility and intraocular pressure in live monkeys.

Exp Eye Res. 2010 Oct;91(4):486-90

Authors: Tan JC, Kiland JA, Gonzalez JM, Gabelt BT, Peters DM, Kaufman PL

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COCH transgene expression in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells and its effect on outflow facility in monkey organ cultured anterior segments.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Apr;51(4):2060-6

Authors: Lee ES, Gabelt BT, Faralli JA, Peters DM, Brandt CR, Kaufman PL, Bhattacharya SK

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COCH transgene expression in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells and its effect on outflow facility in monkey organ cultured anterior segments.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Apr;51(4):2060-6

Authors: Lee ES, Gabelt BT, Faralli JA, Peters DM, Brandt CR, Kaufman PL, Bhattacharya SK

Abstract
Purpose. To determine the effects of COCH transgene expression on cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cell morphology and on outflow facility (OF) in monkey organ cultured anterior segments (MOCAS). Methods. An adenoviral (Ad) vector expressing both cochlin (COCH) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) (AdCOCHGFP) or GFP alone (AdGFP) was used to transduce cultured HTM cells (multiplicity of transduction, 2.8 and 28). COCH transgene expression in transduced HTM cells and the culture medium was verified by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence detection 5 days after transduction. MOCAS were used to test the effect of Ad vectors (2.8 x 10(10) viral particles per segment) on OF. The morphology of transduced MOCAS was evaluated by light microscopy. Results. Western blot analysis showed a viral vector dose-dependent expression of cochlin in transduced cells and the culture medium. There was no notable morphologic change in transduced cells. In MOCAS, cochlin expression was detectable in the medium by 3 days after transduction. A 35% decrease in OF in AdCOCHGFP-transduced MOCAS was detected after 3 days, decreasing by 76% after 12 days when compared to control segments injected with AdGFP. Anterior segment pressure (ASP) more than doubled (P < 0.05) in segments injected with AdCOCHGFP at 12 days after transduction. Light microscopy revealed normal angle structures in transduced segments. Conclusions. Ad vector delivery of the COCH transgene resulted in cochlin expression in HTM cells and MOCAS. Cochlin expression was effective in decreasing OF and increasing ASP in MOCAS, suggesting possible involvement of cochlin in IOP elevation in vivo. COCH gene delivery has potential for use in developing a glaucoma model.

PMID: 19933177 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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COCH transgene expression in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells and its effect on outflow facility in monkey organ cultured anterior segments.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Apr;51(4):2060-6

Authors: Lee ES, Gabelt BT, Faralli JA, Peters DM, Brandt CR, Kaufman PL, Bhattacharya SK

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Suppression and reduction of corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension by anecortave in sheep.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2010 Mar;128(3):365-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Suppression and reduction of corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension by anecortave in sheep.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2010 Mar;128(3):365-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

PMID: 20212210 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Suppression and reduction of corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension by anecortave in sheep.

Arch Ophthalmol. 2010 Mar;128(3):365-6

Authors: Kaufman PL

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Remembering Steven M. Podos, MD, 1937-2009.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1261-2

Authors: Candia OA, Kaufman PL

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Remembering Steven M. Podos, MD, 1937-2009.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1261-2

Authors: Candia OA, Kaufman PL

PMID: 20185833 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Remembering Steven M. Podos, MD, 1937-2009.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1261-2

Authors: Candia OA, Kaufman PL

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Morphology and accommodative function of the vitreous zonule in human and monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1554-64

Authors: Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL, Wasielewski R, Ting-Li L, Croft MA

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Morphology and accommodative function of the vitreous zonule in human and monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1554-64

Authors: Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL, Wasielewski R, Ting-Li L, Croft MA

Abstract
PURPOSE: To explore the attachments of the posterior zonule and vitreous in relation to accommodation and presbyopia in monkeys and humans.
METHODS: Novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) techniques were used to visualize the anterior, intermediate, and posterior vitreous zonule and their connections to the ciliary body, vitreous membrane, lens capsule, and ora serrata, and to characterize their age-related changes and correlate them with loss of accommodative forward movement of the ciliary body. alpha-Chymotrypsin was used focally to lyse the vitreous zonule and determine the effect on movement of the accommodative apparatus in monkeys.
RESULTS: The vitreous attached to the peripheral lens capsule and the ora serrata directly. The pars plana zonule and the posterior tines of the anterior zonule were separated from the vitreous membrane except for strategically placed attachments, collectively termed the vitreous zonule, that may modulate and smooth the forward and backward movements of the entire system. Age-dependent changes in these relationships correlated significantly with loss of accommodative amplitude. Lysis of the intermediate vitreous zonule partially restored accommodative movement.
CONCLUSIONS: The vitreous zonule system may help to smoothly translate to the lens the driving forces of accommodation and disaccommodation generated by the ciliary muscle, while maintaining visual focus and protecting the lens capsule and ora serrata from acute tractional forces. Stiffening of the vitreous zonular system may contribute to age-related loss of accommodation and offer a therapeutic target for presbyopia.

PMID: 19815737 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Morphology and accommodative function of the vitreous zonule in human and monkey eyes.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010 Mar;51(3):1554-64

Authors: Lütjen-Drecoll E, Kaufman PL, Wasielewski R, Ting-Li L, Croft MA