Neal Barney, MD

Dr. Barney is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. His clinical training is in all aspects of ocular immunology including uveitis and inflammatory disease of the anterior segment of the eye. His laboratory interests include the cellular signaling events on the ocular surface undergoing allergic reactions. He is a Principle Investigator on NIH funded research.

Recent Publications

2017

Related Articles

Use of Topical Insulin to Treat Refractory Neurotrophic Corneal Ulcers.

Cornea. 2017 Jul 24;:

Authors: Wang AL, Weinlander E, Metcalf BM, Barney NP, Gamm DM, Nehls SM, Struck MC

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Use of Topical Insulin to Treat Refractory Neurotrophic Corneal Ulcers.

Cornea. 2017 Jul 24;:

Authors: Wang AL, Weinlander E, Metcalf BM, Barney NP, Gamm DM, Nehls SM, Struck MC

Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the clinical course of 6 patients with refractory neurotrophic corneal ulcers that were treated with topical insulin drops.
METHODS: Retrospective chart review of patients who had neurotrophic corneal ulcers or epithelial defects refractory to standard medical and surgical treatment. Insulin drops, prepared by mixing regular insulin in artificial tears with a polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol base at a concentration of 1 unit per milliliter, were prescribed 2 to 3 times daily.
RESULTS: Six patients, aged 2 to 73 years, developed neurotrophic corneal ulcers refractory to a range of medical and surgical treatments, including bandage contact lens, amniotic membrane grafting, and permanent tarsorrhaphy. Each patient was administered topical insulin drops with complete corneal reepithelialization within 7 to 25 days.
CONCLUSIONS: Topical insulin may be a simple and effective treatment for refractory neurotrophic corneal ulcers. Further study is required to determine the clinical efficacy and side effect profile of insulin drops.

PMID: 28742619 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Use of Topical Insulin to Treat Refractory Neurotrophic Corneal Ulcers.

Cornea. 2017 Jul 24;:

Authors: Wang AL, Weinlander E, Metcalf BM, Barney NP, Gamm DM, Nehls SM, Struck MC

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Safety and efficacy of autologous serum eye drop for treatment of dry eyes in graft-versus-host disease.

Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2017 Jun;36(2):152-156

Authors: Azari AA, Karadag R, Kanavi MR, Nehls S, Barney N, Kim K, Longo W, Hematti P, Juckett M

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Safety and efficacy of autologous serum eye drop for treatment of dry eyes in graft-versus-host disease.

Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2017 Jun;36(2):152-156

Authors: Azari AA, Karadag R, Kanavi MR, Nehls S, Barney N, Kim K, Longo W, Hematti P, Juckett M

Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the treatment of autologous serum eye drops (ASED) on dry eyes in patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).
METHODS: A retrospective chart review of 35 patients with a history of ocular GVHD following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that used ASED to alleviate dry eye symptoms was performed. Patients were categorized into three different groups. If patients had available ophthalmic data before and after starting treatment was group 1 (n = 14), had available ophthalmic data after starting treatment in group 2 (n = 10) and had available ophthalmic data before treatment or did not have any data after starting treatment in group 3 (n = 11). Data were collected on patient's age, gender, primary diagnosis, visual acuity and fluorescein corneal staining were collected on individual eyes in order to evaluate the efficacy of the ASED on alleviating dry eye-related signs and symptoms.
RESULTS: No adverse ocular effect from the ASED was found in our series (except one fungal keratitis). All patients reported either improvement (55%) or stability (45%) in their ocular symptoms upon the use of ASED. In patients with available data before and after starting treatment, the corneal staining score improved by a median of 1 (p = 0.003) and the LogMAR visual acuity had a non-significant improvement.
CONCLUSION: In our study, ASED used by patients with ocular GVHD were both safe and effective. ASED should be considered in patients with GVHD who suffer from dry eyes.

PMID: 27380960 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Safety and efficacy of autologous serum eye drop for treatment of dry eyes in graft-versus-host disease.

Cutan Ocul Toxicol. 2017 Jun;36(2):152-156

Authors: Azari AA, Karadag R, Kanavi MR, Nehls S, Barney N, Kim K, Longo W, Hematti P, Juckett M

2016

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Bulbar Conjunctival Molluscum Contagiosum.

Ophthalmology. 2016 Feb;123(2):294

Authors: Ringeisen AL, Raven ML, Barney NP

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Bulbar Conjunctival Molluscum Contagiosum.

Ophthalmology. 2016 Feb;123(2):294

Authors: Ringeisen AL, Raven ML, Barney NP

PMID: 26802706 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Bulbar Conjunctival Molluscum Contagiosum.

Ophthalmology. 2016 Feb;123(2):294

Authors: Ringeisen AL, Raven ML, Barney NP

2014

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Nevus in a pterygium.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Sep;132(9):1044

Authors: Azari AA, Kanavi MR, Jaru-Ampornpan P, Khedr SS, Potter HD, Albert DM, Barney NP

Related Articles

Nevus in a pterygium.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Sep;132(9):1044

Authors: Azari AA, Kanavi MR, Jaru-Ampornpan P, Khedr SS, Potter HD, Albert DM, Barney NP

PMID: 25010216 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Nevus in a pterygium.

JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Sep;132(9):1044

Authors: Azari AA, Kanavi MR, Jaru-Ampornpan P, Khedr SS, Potter HD, Albert DM, Barney NP

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Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with adaptable mechanical and degradation properties for use in biomedical applications.

Macromol Biosci. 2014 May;14(5):687-98

Authors: Parlato M, Reichert S, Barney N, Murphy WL

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Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with adaptable mechanical and degradation properties for use in biomedical applications.

Macromol Biosci. 2014 May;14(5):687-98

Authors: Parlato M, Reichert S, Barney N, Murphy WL

Abstract
Requirements of hydrogels for drug delivery, wound dressings, and surgical implantation can be extensive, including suitable mechanical properties and tailorable degradation time frames. Herein, an adaptable PEG-based hydrogel, whose mechanical properties and degradation rate can be systematically adjusted to meet these criteria by altering simple variables such as the PEG molecular weight, is described. The performance of these hydrogels in three physical manipulations (pushing, pulling, and folding), representative of manipulations that they may undergo during typical biomedical use, is also assessed. While not all of these formulations can withstand these manipulations, a subset did, and it is intended to further optimize these formulations for specific clinical applications. Additionally, the outcomes of the physical manipulation tests indicate that simply having a high modulus does not correlate with biomedical applicability.

PMID: 24949497 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with adaptable mechanical and degradation properties for use in biomedical applications.

Macromol Biosci. 2014 May;14(5):687-98

Authors: Parlato M, Reichert S, Barney N, Murphy WL

2013

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Conjunctivitis: a systematic review of diagnosis and treatment.

JAMA. 2013 Oct 23;310(16):1721-9

Authors: Azari AA, Barney NP

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Conjunctivitis: a systematic review of diagnosis and treatment.

JAMA. 2013 Oct 23;310(16):1721-9

Authors: Azari AA, Barney NP

Abstract
IMPORTANCE: Conjunctivitis is a common problem.
OBJECTIVE: To examine the diagnosis, management, and treatment of conjunctivitis, including various antibiotics and alternatives to antibiotic use in infectious conjunctivitis and use of antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers in allergic conjunctivitis.
EVIDENCE REVIEW: A search of the literature published through March 2013, using PubMed, the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and the Cochrane Library was performed. Eligible articles were selected after review of titles, abstracts, and references.
FINDINGS: Viral conjunctivitis is the most common overall cause of infectious conjunctivitis and usually does not require treatment; the signs and symptoms at presentation are variable. Bacterial conjunctivitis is the second most common cause of infectious conjunctivitis, with most uncomplicated cases resolving in 1 to 2 weeks. Mattering and adherence of the eyelids on waking, lack of itching, and absence of a history of conjunctivitis are the strongest factors associated with bacterial conjunctivitis. Topical antibiotics decrease the duration of bacterial conjunctivitis and allow earlier return to school or work. Conjunctivitis secondary to sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia and gonorrhea requires systemic treatment in addition to topical antibiotic therapy. Allergic conjunctivitis is encountered in up to 40% of the population, but only a small proportion of these individuals seek medical help; itching is the most consistent sign in allergic conjunctivitis, and treatment consists of topical antihistamines and mast cell inhibitors.
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The majority of cases in bacterial conjunctivitis are self-limiting and no treatment is necessary in uncomplicated cases. However, conjunctivitis caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia and conjunctivitis in contact lens wearers should be treated with antibiotics. Treatment for viral conjunctivitis is supportive. Treatment with antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers alleviates the symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis.

PMID: 24150468 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Conjunctivitis: a systematic review of diagnosis and treatment.

JAMA. 2013 Oct 23;310(16):1721-9

Authors: Azari AA, Barney NP