Leandro Teixeira, DVM, MSc, DACVP

Dr. Teixeira is a Board Certified Veterinary Pathologist and an Assistant Professor at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison. His clinical and research interests include comparative ocular pathology, microscopic imaging (light and electron microscopy, multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy and computational image analysis) and extracellular matrix alterations in ocular disease. Other research interests include animal models of glaucoma, ocular immunopathology and morphology of ocular neovascular diseases.

Discipline: Ocular Pathology

Recent Publications

2015

Related Articles

Canine orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a report of 18 cases.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2015 Apr 1;

Authors: Scott EM, Teixeira LB, Flanders DJ, Dubielzig RR, McLellan GJ

Related Articles

Canine orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a report of 18 cases.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2015 Apr 1;

Authors: Scott EM, Teixeira LB, Flanders DJ, Dubielzig RR, McLellan GJ

Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe clinical and pathological features of canine orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (COR).
METHODS: Retrospective review of patients with COR from the archives of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (1983-2014).
RESULTS: Eighteen cases of COR were identified, all diagnosed in an 8-year period (2006-2014). Affected dogs were typically young (range 1-8; median 2 years), and both sexes were equally represented. Common clinical signs included exophthalmos (16/18) with dorsolateral deviation of the globe (10/18) and elevation of the nictitans (12/18). Ultrasonography, performed in nine cases, revealed an orbital mass with mixed echogenicity and posterior globe indentation. Advanced imaging, performed in nine cases, demonstrated a soft tissue mass with variable contrast enhancement and lysis of the orbital bones (5/9). Histologically, all tumors were subclassified as embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. All neoplasms demonstrated positive immunohistochemical labeling for desmin, and 14/18 were positive for skeletal muscle actin. Follow-up information was available for 15/18 cases. Older dogs, aged 6-8 years, had no clinical signs of recurrence or metastasis 8-13 months postdiagnosis (4/4). Most younger dogs (9/11), aged 1-4 years, were euthanized within 6 months (median 2.5 months) of diagnosis due to recurrence at the surgical site (5/9) and/or metastasis (5/9).
CONCLUSIONS: Canine orbital rhabdomyosarcoma is a highly malignant neoplasm in juvenile dogs, but may be amenable to surgical resection in older dogs. This duality in biologic behavior may reflect differences in tissue of origin between juvenile onset tumors and adult onset tumors.

PMID: 25846977 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Related Articles

Canine orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a report of 18 cases.

Vet Ophthalmol. 2015 Apr 1;

Authors: Scott EM, Teixeira LB, Flanders DJ, Dubielzig RR, McLellan GJ

2014

Related Articles

PDGF-BB does not accelerate healing in diabetic mice with splinted skin wounds.

PLoS One. 2014;9(8):e104447

Authors: Park SA, Raghunathan VK, Shah NM, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, Covert J, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, Abbott NL, McAnulty J, Murphy CJ

Related Articles

PDGF-BB does not accelerate healing in diabetic mice with splinted skin wounds.

PLoS One. 2014;9(8):e104447

Authors: Park SA, Raghunathan VK, Shah NM, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, Covert J, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, Abbott NL, McAnulty J, Murphy CJ

Abstract
Topical application of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is considered to accelerate tissue repair of impaired chronic wounds. However, the vast literature is plagued with conflicting reports of its efficacy in animal models and this is often influenced by a wide array of experimental variables making it difficult to compare the results across the studies. To mitigate the confounding variables that influence the efficacy of topically applied PDGF-BB, we used a controlled full thickness splinted excisional wound model in db/db mice (type 2 diabetic mouse model) for our investigations. A carefully-defined silicone-splinted wound model, with reduced wound contraction, controlled splint and bandage maintenance, allowing for healing primarily by reepithelialization was employed. Two splinted 8 mm dorsal full thickness wounds were made in db/db mice. Wounds were topically treated once daily with either 3 µg PDGF-BB in 30 µl of 5% PEG-PBS vehicle or an equal volume of vehicle for 10 days. Body weights, wound contraction, wound closure, reepithelialization, collagen content, and wound bed inflammation were evaluated clinically and histopathologically. The bioactivity of PDGF-BB was confirmed by in vitro proliferation assay. PDGF-BB, although bioactive in vitro, failed to accelerate wound healing in vivo in the db/db mice using the splinted wound model. Considering that the predominant mechanism of wound healing in humans is by re-epithelialization, the most appropriate model for evaluating therapeutics is one that uses splints to prevent excessive wound contraction. Here, we report that PDGF-BB does not promote wound closure by re-epithelialization in a murine splinted wound model. Our results highlight that the effects of cytoactive factors reported in vivo ought to be carefully interpreted with critical consideration of the wound model used.

PMID: 25121729 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

PDGF-BB does not accelerate healing in diabetic mice with splinted skin wounds.

PLoS One. 2014;9(8):e104447

Authors: Park SA, Raghunathan VK, Shah NM, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, Covert J, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, Abbott NL, McAnulty J, Murphy CJ