Jonathan F. McAnulty, DVM, PhD

Dr. McAnulty is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a general surgeon with expertise in microvascular surgery, solid organ transplantation, and organ preservation. Dr. McAnulty, in collaboration with Dr. Christopher Murphy, has validated a model of delayed skin wound healing for the testing of compounds that stimulate the healing of wounds.

Recent Publications

2017

Related Articles

A Carrel patch technique for renal transplantation in cats.

Vet Surg. 2017 Aug 31;:

Authors: Budgeon C, Hardie RJ, McAnulty JF

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A Carrel patch technique for renal transplantation in cats.

Vet Surg. 2017 Aug 31;:

Authors: Budgeon C, Hardie RJ, McAnulty JF

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of a Carrel patch method in feline renal transplantation.
STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive case series.
ANIMALS: Nine healthy donor cats and 9 client recipient cats with chronic renal failure.
METHODS: Renal transplantation was performed in 9 cats with chronic renal failure after collection of a donor's left kidney with a Carrel patch technique. A patch of donor aortic wall was removed with either 2 or 1 renal artery (ies) (n = 1 and 8 cats, respectively) central to the patch, with a cuff of tissue (≤1 mm) protruding from the base of the vessels. The Carrel patch was implanted in recipient cats with an end-to-side artery-to-aorta anastomosis, in a simple-continuous pattern of 9-0 nylon. The renal vein and ureter were implanted as previously described.
RESULTS: All donors and recipients survived surgery without vascular complication.
CONCLUSION: The Carrel patch is a novel approach allowing the harvest of kidneys with multiple renal arteries. The technique also simplified the implant procedure, potentially decreasing the risks of bleeding and thrombosis.

PMID: 28858383 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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A Carrel patch technique for renal transplantation in cats.

Vet Surg. 2017 Aug 31;:

Authors: Budgeon C, Hardie RJ, McAnulty JF

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Effect of cold storage on immediate graft function in an experimental model of renal transplantation in cats.

Am J Vet Res. 2017 Mar;78(3):330-339

Authors: Csomos RA, Hardie RJ, Schmiedt CW, Delaney FA, McAnulty JF

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Effect of cold storage on immediate graft function in an experimental model of renal transplantation in cats.

Am J Vet Res. 2017 Mar;78(3):330-339

Authors: Csomos RA, Hardie RJ, Schmiedt CW, Delaney FA, McAnulty JF

Abstract
OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of cold storage (CS) on immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts in cats. ANIMALS 15 healthy 1-year-old cats. PROCEDURES Cats were assigned to 2 groups and underwent autotransplantation of the left kidney followed by nephrectomy of the right kidney. The left kidney was autotransplanted either immediately (IT group; n = 6) or after being flushed with a cold sucrose phosphate solution and stored on ice while the implant site was prepared (CS group; 9). Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were monitored daily and autografts were ultrasonographically examined intermittently for 14 days after surgery. RESULTS Mean duration of CS was 24 minutes for the CS group. Posttransplantation serum creatinine and BUN concentrations for the CS group had lower peak values, returned to the respective reference ranges quicker, and were generally significantly lower than those for the IT group. Mean posttransplantation autograft size for the CS group was smaller than that for the IT group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts following a short period of CS was better than that of renal autografts that did not undergo CS, which suggested CS protected grafts from ischemic injury and may decrease perioperative complications, speed recovery, and improve the long-term outcome for cats with renal transplants. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Cats metabolize immunosuppressive drugs in a manner similar to humans; therefore, renal transplantation in cats may serve as a desirable model for investigating the effects of renal transplantation in human patients.

PMID: 28240954 [PubMed - in process]

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Effect of cold storage on immediate graft function in an experimental model of renal transplantation in cats.

Am J Vet Res. 2017 Mar;78(3):330-339

Authors: Csomos RA, Hardie RJ, Schmiedt CW, Delaney FA, McAnulty JF

2015

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Importance of defining experimental conditions in a mouse excisional wound model.

Wound Repair Regen. 2015 Feb 19;

Authors: Park SA, Covert J, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, DeRemer SL, Abbott NL, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, McAnulty JF, Murphy CJ

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Importance of defining experimental conditions in a mouse excisional wound model.

Wound Repair Regen. 2015 Feb 19;

Authors: Park SA, Covert J, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, DeRemer SL, Abbott NL, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, McAnulty JF, Murphy CJ

Abstract
The murine dorsum dermal excisional wound model has been widely utilized with or without splint application. However, variations in experimental methods create challenges for direct comparison of results provided in the literature and for design of new wound healing studies. Here we investigated the effects of wound location and size, number of wounds, type of adhesive used for splint fixation on wound healing using splinted or unsplinted dorsum excisional full thickness wound models. One or two 6- or 8-mm full thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in genetically diabetic but heterozygous mice (Dock7(m) +/+ Lepr(db) ). Two different adhesives: tissue adhesive (TA) and an over the counter cyanoacrylate adhesive "Krazy glue(®) " (OTCA) were used to fix splints. Wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, collagen deposition and inflammation were compared between groups. No significant effect of wound number (1 vs 2), side (left vs right, cranial vs caudal) or size on wound healing was observed. The OTCA group had a significantly higher splint success compared to the TA group that resulted in significantly higher reepithelialization and collagen deposition in the OTCA group. Understanding the outcomes and effects of the variables will help investigators choose appropriate experimental conditions for the study purpose and interpret data. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 25703258 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Importance of defining experimental conditions in a mouse excisional wound model.

Wound Repair Regen. 2015 Feb 19;

Authors: Park SA, Covert J, Teixeira L, Motta MJ, DeRemer SL, Abbott NL, Dubielzig R, Schurr M, Isseroff RR, McAnulty JF, Murphy CJ

2012

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Additional thoughts on ovariectomy versus ovariohysterectomy.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012 Apr 15;240(8):936-7

Authors: McAnulty JF, Bjorling DE, Hardie R, Colopy S

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Additional thoughts on ovariectomy versus ovariohysterectomy.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012 Apr 15;240(8):936-7

Authors: McAnulty JF, Bjorling DE, Hardie R, Colopy S

PMID: 22577681 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Additional thoughts on ovariectomy versus ovariohysterectomy.

J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012 Apr 15;240(8):936-7

Authors: McAnulty JF, Bjorling DE, Hardie R, Colopy S

2011

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Prospective comparison of cisterna chyli ablation to pericardectomy for treatment of spontaneously occurring idiopathic chylothorax in the dog.

Vet Surg. 2011 Dec;40(8):926-34

Authors: McAnulty JF

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Prospective comparison of cisterna chyli ablation to pericardectomy for treatment of spontaneously occurring idiopathic chylothorax in the dog.

Vet Surg. 2011 Dec;40(8):926-34

Authors: McAnulty JF

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Prospective comparison of cisterna chyli ablation (CCA) or pericardectomy (PC) for chylothorax.
STUDY DESIGN: Randomized prospective study. SUBJECT POPULATION: Dogs with idiopathic chylothorax (n= 23).
METHODS: Dogs were treated by thoracic duct ligation (TDL) with either CCA (n = 12) or PC (n = 11). Long-term outcomes, intraoperative central venous pressures (CVPs) and pericardial histology were assessed. Dogs with persistent chylothorax were offered retreatment by the alternative procedure.
RESULTS: Ten (83%) dogs treated by CCA-TDL and 6 (60%) treated by PC-TDL resolved their chylothorax. Retreatment in 4 dogs resulted in resolution in 2 dogs and 2 perioperative deaths. Four dogs developed nonchylous effusions; 2 of which resolved after initiating steroid therapy, 1 of which was unsuccessfully treated by PC, and 1 continues to be managed by thoracocentesis 6.5 years later. CVPs were normal in most dogs and unaffected by PC. On histology, pericardial tissues had extensive external surface fibrosis with mild inflammation. On follow-up (≤ 6.5 years), no recurrence of pleural effusions occurred after initial resolution.
CONCLUSIONS: CCA-TDL appears to offer improved outcomes over historical results with TDL. Results with PC-TDL were more variable for unknown reasons. Venous pressure measurements did not support the hypothesis that venous hypertension was involved in chylothorax or response to therapy in these dogs.

PMID: 22091690 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Prospective comparison of cisterna chyli ablation to pericardectomy for treatment of spontaneously occurring idiopathic chylothorax in the dog.

Vet Surg. 2011 Dec;40(8):926-34

Authors: McAnulty JF

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Single paracostal approach to thoracic duct and cisterna chyli: experimental study and case series.

Vet Surg. 2011 Oct;40(7):786-94

Authors: Staiger BA, Stanley BJ, McAnulty JF

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Single paracostal approach to thoracic duct and cisterna chyli: experimental study and case series.

Vet Surg. 2011 Oct;40(7):786-94

Authors: Staiger BA, Stanley BJ, McAnulty JF

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To-determine the feasibility of a single paracostal abdominal approach for thoracic duct ligation (TDL) and cisterna chyli ablation (CCA) in dogs with chylothorax.
STUDY DESIGN: Observational study and prospective case series.
ANIMALS: Normal dogs (n = 5) and dogs with chylothorax (n = 8).
METHODS: A single paracostal approach with transdiaphragmatic extension for TDL and CCA was developed experimentally (n = 5) and used in 8 clinical cases with subtotal pericardectomy (SPE) performed in 4 dogs. Surgery time, complications, hospitalization time, outcome, and follow-up of clinical cases were recorded.
RESULTS: Exposure of relevant anatomy was excellent; vital lymphatic staining facilitated identification of lymphatic structures. In clinical cases, mean surgery time for TDL + CCA was 136 minutes. Mean hospitalization time was 3.1 days. Seven of 8 cases survived, with 1 dog dying of heart failure shortly after discharge. One dog required a second (left) paracostal approach to ligate 2 more lymphatic vessels. On follow-up (median, 7 months; range, 2-20 months), there was complete resolution of chylothorax in 6 dogs.
CONCLUSIONS: A single paracostal approach provides excellent exposure of cisterna chyli, caudal thoracic duct, and intestinal lymphatics. This approach eliminates the need for repositioning during combined TDL + CCA procedures and avoids an intercostal thoracotomy.

PMID: 22380664 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Single paracostal approach to thoracic duct and cisterna chyli: experimental study and case series.

Vet Surg. 2011 Oct;40(7):786-94

Authors: Staiger BA, Stanley BJ, McAnulty JF

2010

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Effects of renal autograft ischemic storage and reperfusion on intraoperative hemodynamic patterns and plasma renin concentrations in clinically normal cats undergoing renal autotransplantation and contralateral nephrectomy.

Am J Vet Res. 2010 Oct;71(10):1220-7

Authors: Schmiedt CW, Mercurio A, Vandenplas M, McAnulty JF, Hurley DJ

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Effects of renal autograft ischemic storage and reperfusion on intraoperative hemodynamic patterns and plasma renin concentrations in clinically normal cats undergoing renal autotransplantation and contralateral nephrectomy.

Am J Vet Res. 2010 Oct;71(10):1220-7

Authors: Schmiedt CW, Mercurio A, Vandenplas M, McAnulty JF, Hurley DJ

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of the duration of cold Ischemia on the renin-angiotensin system during renal transplantation In cats and to define the potential Influence of vasoactive factors in renal tissue following cold ischemic storage versus warm ischemic storage.
ANIMALS: 10 purpose-bred 6-month-old sexually Intact female cats.
PROCEDURES: 10 cats underwent renal autotransplantation after 30 minutes (n=5) or 3 hours (5) of simple, ex vivo cold storage of renal autographs. Following autograft reperfusion, direct hemodynamic variables were measured with a telemetric Implant and samples were collected for plasma renin concentration. Activation of vascular-related genes (renin, endothelin, and angiotensin converting enzyme) relative to 2-hour simple cold or warm ischemia was also evaluated.
RESULTS: No significant difference between groups was detected In any of the hemodynamic variables or postreperfusion plasma renin concentrations measured in this study relative to the duration of cold ischemic storage. There was also no difference between warm- and cold-stored kidneys in the expression of vascular-related genes.
CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Prolonged renal Ischemia for clinically relevant durations does not appear to predispose clinically normal cats to altered hemodynamics or high plasma renin concentrations following graft reperfusion. Activation of vasoactive genes does not appear to be Influenced by type of Ischemia over 2 hours.

PMID: 20919911 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Related Articles

Effects of renal autograft ischemic storage and reperfusion on intraoperative hemodynamic patterns and plasma renin concentrations in clinically normal cats undergoing renal autotransplantation and contralateral nephrectomy.

Am J Vet Res. 2010 Oct;71(10):1220-7

Authors: Schmiedt CW, Mercurio A, Vandenplas M, McAnulty JF, Hurley DJ

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Hypothermic organ preservation by static storage methods: Current status and a view to the future.

Cryobiology. 2010 Jul;60(3 Suppl):S13-9

Authors: McAnulty JF

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Hypothermic organ preservation by static storage methods: Current status and a view to the future.

Cryobiology. 2010 Jul;60(3 Suppl):S13-9

Authors: McAnulty JF

Abstract
The donor organ shortage is the largest problem in transplantation today and is one where organ preservation technology has an important role to play. Static storage of solid organs, especially of the kidney, continues to be the most common method employed for storage and transport of organs from deceased donors. However, the increase in organs obtained from expanded criteria donors and donors with cardiac death provide new challenges in crafting effective preservation methods for the future. This article reviews the current status of static hypothermic storage methods and discusses potential avenues for future exploitation of this technology as the available organ pool is expanded into the more marginal donor categories.

PMID: 19538951 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Hypothermic organ preservation by static storage methods: Current status and a view to the future.

Cryobiology. 2010 Jul;60(3 Suppl):S13-9

Authors: McAnulty JF